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What’s The Best Carrier Oil for CBD?

Carrier oils are important in CBD oils and some other CBD products by helping to stabilize and aid in the absorption of CBD.
 
MCT oil (we use coconut oil) is the most popular carrier oil used for CBD due to its cost, neutral flavor, and stability leading to a long shelf life. Sativa uses MCT oil. When it comes to people picky about taste, neutral flavor is best. 
 
You don’t need to worry about choosing a specific carrier oil (unless you have an allergy to coconut oil, medium chain triglycerides, or any other part of MCT Oil (medium chain triglycerides), since they will all effectively promote the absorption of CBD. At present, we have no good research to help prove there is a “best” carrier oil in terms of enhancing the absorption of your CBD.
 
However, we do have research pointing to increased bioavailability with MCT Oils:
 
“Within the gastrointestinal tract, MCT and LCT are digested to their respective fatty acids; however, LC fatty acids are repackaged as LCT into chylomicrons for transport via the lymphatic system via the peripheral circulation. Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) because of their shorter chain lengths do not require chylomicron formation for their absorption and transport (Marten et al., 2006). Therefore, MCFA travel directly to the liver via the portal circulation, bypassing peripheral tissues such as adipose tissue. The different mode of transport for MCT compared to LCT allow for quicker absorption and utilization of MCT.” – Sciencedirect.com
 
We also have a study from 2014 that points to the superior extreme high heat stability of coconut oil over olive oil here. This may indicate a longer shelf life for CBD suspended in coconut oil especially if exposed to higher temperatures in warmer climates.
 

References

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